Posts Tagged ‘Job’


The other day, while conducting a mock interview workshop, I asked the interviewee what compensation he was looking for. He proceeded to say that he needed at least six figures because he has two kids in college and alimony payments in addition to his mortgage payments. Now you might think that this is a reasonable approach, to determine what your obligations are and therefore what you need to earn.

However, your obligations have no relevancy to the company or to the value you bring to an organization. The reality is that whatever projects, processes and tasks you do for a company need to contribute to either the growth of revenue, the reduction of costs or the mitigation of risk. If your work is not helping the company in any of these areas, it is hard for a company to justify paying your salary. Therefore it is essential for you to understand how your work in impacting your organization.

In an earlier blog I wrote about 10 Tips to Optimize Your Career Security. This is the fourth instalment, Tracking Your Success. If you have followed the first tip and ask the right questions, you will understand how your projects and tasks fit into the needs and goals of your company. Once you understand this, establish Key Performance Indexes (KPI’s) relevant for your tasks and projects to measure your growth and performance. These can be in the area of time saved, improved efficiencies, improved productivity, and improved quality. You can then measure your performance against when you took over a position, or show year to year improvement.

Renowned management thought leader Peter Drucker is often quoted as saying that “you can’t manage what you can’t measure.” What this means that you can’t know whether or not you are successful unless success is defined and tracked.  With a clearly established metric for success, you can quantify progress and adjust your process to produce the desired outcome.  Without clear objectives, you’re stuck in a constant state of going through the motions

Not only do these measurements help your organization to understand your success, but it also helps you to understand your value. When you are able to articulate your success through quantified accomplishments, you demonstrate that you are aware of how your role impacts an organization, and that you are not just going through the motions, but striving for the success of the company you work for. You are no longer a commodity for the company, but a solution for their problems and a resource for their opportunities.

This blog is written by Greg Johnson of Above The Rim Executive Coaching

Gold Bars Image courtesy of ponsulak / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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LinkedIn is one of the most powerful Career Management tools business professionals can tap into to maximize the achievement of their objectives. LinkedIn has recently rolled out a new feature that is a great way to facilitate this and to enhance your online brand. Like all Social media, LinkedIn requires two key philosophies. First is Pay-It-Forward, and the second is “Think It Through”. A little bit of thought, and the desire to pay it forward will take you a long way. Keeping this in mind will help you use the brand new Skills & Endorsements tool to take your LinkedIn engagement to the next level. In order to help you do this, I have developed the following EZ steps.

  1. Add Skills to your profile: Click “More” on the top of the LinkedIn menu than select Skill & Expertise. Add the skills that relate to your profession that you are recognized for and that you use regularly on the job. LinkedIn allows you to choose up to 50. Choose as many as apply.
  2. If you already have some skills listed, go to the edit profile mode and click to add more skills
  3. After you add skills, you can click the skill to specify your level of proficiency as well as the number of years you have been utilizing the skill.
  4. Endorse Others: Now pay it forward. Go to the profile of contacts you want to endorse. A box opens up with some suggested skills to endorse. Eliminate skills you are not able to endorse, and add skills you want to endorse. Then click the endorse button
  5. Take an additional couple of minutes to scroll down to their skills section and review their skills. Click all the skills that make sense for you to endorse based on your knowledge of the individual.

Don’t just select the skills suggested by LinkedIn, endorse and move on. Unfortunately, even if you are trying to help the person out, the message that you are giving is that you are not putting thought into what you are doing. This will hurt your reputation, and people will assume if you are “lazy” on LinkedIn, you will be lazy in other parts of your profession. Take some time to do it right, the ROI on the time spent will come back much higher.

This blog is by Greg Johnson

Last week I discussed the best way to get around the salary question for online applications is to stop relying on online applications and pursue the hidden job market. This makes sense not only to get around the salary question, and the general road block of HR, but also because 80% of the truly open jobs are in the hidden job market. Before we go any further, what is the hidden job market? It is not that the jobs are buried somewhere hidden. It is any opportunity that is not currently posted on the job boards. This can consist of jobs that are in the still in the internal candidate search process, jobs that are in the process of being defined, or opportunities to solve problems that have yet to be identified in a job description. Your success in this depends on a purposeful strategy with a clearly defined goal of where you want to go. In the words of Yogi Berra:

“You’ve got to be very careful if you don’t know where you are going, because you might not get there.”

Start off creating a list of Target Companies based, not on jobs posted, but on your passions and interests. While not all companies have job openings, all companies have problems. In order to differentiate yourself from the masses of job seekers, you need to position yourself as a solution, not a job seeker. In order to position yourself as a solution you need to know the problems and headaches of your target companies. In order to understand the problems, you need to research your target companies. Finally in order to research your target companies, you need to have target companies.

Once you have your list of target companies, begin your research, identifying their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. You can find a few resources here.

From here you are in a position to produce industry wide special reports which are great keys to get you in the door for information meetings. Use these as a launch-pad for a social media campaign to establish your reputation as a thought leader and subject matter expert in your particular niche. Simultaneously, you need to network network network. This doesn’t mean just attend a ton of networking event collecting business cards to put on your desk. Strategically and purposefully engage in professional organizations taking positions on committees and boards, so that you can work on a professional level with influential people in your target industry. For your success in the hidden job market, it is not necessarily what you know, or even what you know, but who knows you, and what their perception is of you that will maximize your career opportunities.

How are you strategically researching your target companies and spreading your reputation as a subject matter expert or thought leader in your particular niche?


This week I will again be coaching the Advanced Career Strategies Class at Brandman University with John Hall. It has been my honor and privlage to work with John numerous times over the past year or so. I have learned so much from John, and working with the groups of extremely talented professionals and executives. Often they have come into the beginning of the class disheartened by the daunting task of getting their career back on track, and I have really enjoyed watching them get their mojo back, leaving the last day brimming with confidence in themselves and the tools they have learned that will help them get their next career position. John Hall, referred to both in the Orange County Register and Wall Street Journal as the John Wooden of career coaching, teaches that most professionals wing their job search. However in todays challenging market with downsizing, rightsizing and restructuring, it is imperative to present yourself as the A+ candidate. How do you do this? Rather than positioning yourself as a job seeker, position yourself as the solution to the problems of your target companies. We all know that most companies are not currently hiring. However, how many of you have ever worked for a company that didn’t have any problems? All companies have problems. Therefore, it is essential that you research your target companies to determine what their problems are. You then can, based on your skills and experience, brand yourself as the solution to the problems of your target companies instead of branding yourself as a job seeker. The process of branding yourself, learning to articulate and project your brand image as a solution, together with the company research is not easy. It takes a lot of hard work. That is the bad news. The good news for you is that since it is so hard, very few people are willing to embrace what it takes to do the job. If you really want your next career position, you have to be committed put the hard work and long hours into a strategic, purposefully developed advanced career plan,


As I get started in blogging, I would like to give a quick shout-out to some of the people I am indebted to for mentoring and helping to shape my career.

First to my Career Coach Mentors: John Hall, Kimberly Roush and Robert Owen, Thank you so much for your guidance and kind support. What I have learned from you is invaluable!

To my Networking & Social Media Mentors: Neal Schaffer, Tim Tyrell-Smith, Sven Johnston, Hank Blank and Ted Robison. While I still have much to learn, you have guided me so far, and I am grateful for your friendship and expertise.

Finally, to my Personal Mentors: David Weinberg, James Tehrani, Karen Vernamonti, Michael Verosky, Norman Naylor, Jeff Baker, Harry Charters, Cliff Phipps and Ted Toch, your integrity, principles of professionalism, and most of all, your faith have been a guiding light for me. Thank you all for inspiration, love and the foundation of faith and hope you have helped me develop.

I look forward to our continuing relationships, and opportunities to continue helping each other out.